White Lies

5 months ago   |   Words: Natalie Lorimer

White Lies are on the cusp of a new chapter in their history. The trio has found a new home with a new record label and will mark the tenth anniversary of their inception with their forthcoming album, ‘Five.’ With their sound evolving into something bolder and more complex than previous efforts, the band has found themselves pushed to new creative heights. Their latest single, ‘Believe It,’ embodies this shift in direction; a four-minute, synth-powered singalong that explores the process of therapy from multiple angles.

We spoke to White Lies bassist and lyricist Charles Cave about the mindfulness of weightlifting, his advice for helping friends out of a dark place, and an epic table tennis match with Kings of Leon frontman Caleb Followill.

What are you listening to, reading and watching at the moment?

I’m reading ‘Hombre’ by Elmore Leonard, I’m also re-reading Salinger’s ‘For Esme….’ collection of stories for a fiction-writing course I’ve been part of for a few years, and then I’m also dipping in an out of a non-fiction book about the fall of Rome by Bryan Ward-Perkins. And finally I have a book called The Daily Stoic by my bed, for a little daily dose of helpful and practical philosophy.

I tend to seek comfort in things I know and love: ‘Scritti Politti, Pantera, ‘Hats’ by the Blue Nile….’The Far East Suite’ by Ellington. These are all records that just sit permanently by my hi-fi, poised for action. But slowly I’m educating myself with classical music I missed out on growing up.

I don’t watch much TV. My girlfriend somehow manages to watch everything, so I wait for her to tell me something is really worth watching before I do. The last amazing thing I remember watching on TV was the War and Peace dramatisation with Paul Dano. Also, the Quincy Jones documentary on Netflix is fantastic!

What has been your biggest life challenge so far and what did you do to overcome it?

I think if we keep being open, stay in a constant state of studentship, and always try to view everything from different perspectives, then we can overcome anything. Easier said than done, of course, most of the time.

What would constitute a ‘perfect’ day for you?

Brunch, a long Autumn walk somewhere beautiful, an evening in one of my favourite pubs with friends, food, perhaps some really great live jazz, and some beautiful dogs.

For what in your life do you feel most grateful?

I’m completely aware of my privilege and the opportunities I’ve been able to act on because of it. I think most of all I feel so grateful for my home, and for the close friends I have around me, and for the resources with which to express myself in all the failed and successful ways I have so far, and continue to do.

Complete this sentence: “Ace mental health for me means…”

The ability to react in an emotionally useful way to the multitude of experiences life puts before us.

What do you eat to stay healthy?

I compensate for my sweet tooth with exercise. I try to base my core diet around boiled eggs, fresh vegetables, lean meat and fish, and plenty of water. You really can’t drink enough water. I’m also becoming a fan of intermittent fasting. It makes me feel good.

Do you have a daily routine of exercise or do you make it up as you go along? 

I try to go to the gym three times a week, where I mostly lift heavy weights and do very short sprints. I really love lifting weights for the focus it requires. I’m loathed to throw the ‘mindful’ word around too much, but I’ve found lifting weights more than cardio exercises really keeps my mind focussed in the absolute present. You can’t start daydreaming, or worrying about what’s going on in your personal life, because you will drop a heavy steel bar on your chest or back! On the days I don’t go to the gym, I really do try to walk a good six miles a day.

Here at The Mind Map we remember playing football and ‘tag’ – running around the playground everyday and loving it – can you share a similar memory?

I spent most of my primary and secondary school years trying as best as I could to avoid any physical exertion. To say I wasn’t ‘sporty’ is a massive understatement. In secondary school, after the age of 15, you got to chose your own sport option on a Wednesday afternoon. I spent five years trying to find ‘the easiest sport’. Unfortunately, I made some term-long mistakes. Turns out fencing is really hard, and sweaty, and the outfit stinks. Also turns out the table tennis at a fiercely competitive level is equally strenuous. I have to say though, that came in handy when – cut to ten years later – I beat Caleb Followill at a heated game of table tennis in an arena dressing room somewhere in the midwest. Big crowd watching – [Caleb’s wife] Lily Aldridge included…

What three songs lift your spirits?

Paul Simon – Mother and Child Reunion

Yellow Magic Orchestra – Sportsmen
Scritti Politti – Perfect Way

What advice do you offer to friends when they are feeling overwhelmed?

Chose a sport or exercise that demands your full focus, attention, and strength. Also, for a bit of very very specific advice –  search for ‘Michael Sealey’ on YouTube. You have to get over his oddly porno tone of voice, but his videos have worked absolute wonders for me. I really mean it. Give them a go.

I’d like to twist the question now, to add a last comment on something I feel quite strongly about. Instead of offering advice to friends when they are feeling overwhelmed, I’d like to offer advice to friends who want to help their friends who are overwhelmed.

There is a lot on the internet regarding mental health awareness about TALKING. About providing a safe space for those suffering to talk, and to feel comfortable talking and opening up about their experience and agony. This is of course very important, and beneficial. Someone caught in a depressive state with nobody to talk to is a lot worse off than someone with a friendly ear to chew. HOWEVER – I really think too much emphasis has been put onto this, and we need to shift awareness to the practical things we can all do to help those in need. I’ll be honest with you, if you’re friend is having an AWFUL time, your text saying “I’m here to talk whenever you want” is probably not enough. Think of talking as mild painkiller. We need ways to actually help this person recover quickly from what they’re afflicted with.

So here is my, possibly controversial advice: Lie. Make up a big fat lie that gets this person you are worried about to come and be with you doing something slightly strenuous, something that requires focus, and something that requires a degree of sociability. Have you been meaning to re-paint a wall in your bedroom for a while? Perfect. Call, text, or go an physically collect your friend that you’re worried about from their home and say: “I need a massive favour, mate. I’m really sorry. I started painting my bedroom wall and I’ve just bitten off more than I can chew. Can I borrow you for a few hours? I’ll owe you a MASSIVE FAVOUR. And I’ll buy you brunch to make up for it.” That’s just one example. Borrow a dog, and call your mate and say “You’re good with dogs aren’t you? OK so I said I’d look after Rex but I literally don’t know what I’m doing and I’m scared its going to run away when I have to walk it….”

White Lies will embark on a European and UK tour in 2019. Dates and ticket details available here.

Greg, Adele and Joel of Bloom

2 weeks ago   |   Words: Phil Bridges   |   Photography: Phil Bridges

As Birkenhead bathes in the low March sun, broken liners await repair in the adjacent Cammell Laird shipyard. These sleeping giants are a fitting symbol of restoration as I near Bloom, the new home to mental health charity The Open Door Centre.

Opened in February, following seven years in Liscard, the charity’s new home is a cocoon of wellbeing. On entering the muralled building, muted dream-pop soundtracks bubbling curry and a wood burner crackles in a communal cafe area. Breakout spaces and therapy sheds are accessible towards the back of the tastefully renovated warehouse space. It’s the antithesis to sterile offices under flyovers and suburban clinics you might normally associate with therapy. It is 11am and the venue has just opened for a day of delivering mental health support to its 15-30 year old members. Gathered on a bench are Adele, Joel and Greg, three amiable 20 somethings, who channel their respective mental health experiences into full time roles at the charity. Over the course of our interview, The Open Door’s mantra of being a charity by young people for young people is clear.

Before we delve into a serious discussion around lived experience, the challenges young people face and therapy, I ask the interviewees to confirm their names. Joel deadpans “Joel Dipple. Nipple with a D” – propelling his colleagues into a collective belly laugh. “I genuinely never made that connection,” Greg chortles. The exchange is emblematic of how The Open Door houses vital conversations in accessible surrounds. It’s a Russian doll of depth – therapy punctuated with humour and warmth. Working on a free membership format, the charity supports young people feeling down, low, stressed or anxious, through its Computerised Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CCBT) tool ‘Bazaar: A Marketplace For The Mind’. Visitors are guided through the eight week training with someone of a similar age and character – providing a perfect blend of human interaction and accessible online intervention.

Adele Iddison, 25, Wirral, centre co-ordinator

PB: What are your own experiences around mental health

AI: It probably all started when I was in my early teens – a bit of anxiety and depression around my brother going to the army. It wasn’t taken seriously though. It was just seen as something to kind of shake off. But it developed into this horrible depression that I tried to ignore at first until I went to uni and it all came to a head. I dropped out of uni and just felt really low with no direction. The pressure of getting work added to it. 

PB: What has helped you?

AI: I think just talking to people about it, because that was my main issue – I just never spoke to anyone about it, I think because of that experience when I was younger and it not being taken seriously. It kind of shut me up as I got older. Once I did speak out about it, how I actually really felt, which was worse than what people thought, that’s when I was taken seriously.

This job keeps me well. Helping other people has really helped me. It’s helped with my confidence as well. Also, just making sure that I’m with people. Making sure that I’m at least doing something that I enjoy at least once a week – having that balance and making sure that I have structure.

PB: What challenges do you think young people face?

AI: I think the main challenge is not being taken seriously, and that worry of “If I do tell people, will I be taken seriously? Will people want to help or will they just think I’m weird?” You know, all the stigma around it as well – I think that’s one of the main challenges. And again, finding that support. There is a lot out there but it’s more about trying to find the right kind of support. It’s very clinical, which can work for some people but a lot of people need that feeling of being able to approach people. I think that’s a challenge for young people as well.

PB: How can The Open Door Centre help young people?

AI: We’re a non-clinical service. We have the volunteer programme, so we allow people to be paired with people that have that relatability factor to them. All the volunteers have had their own experiences too, including staff too. I think that’s a really big factor that comes into it at the centre. The course that we do as well is bespoke – there’s no course out there like it. It’s unique to the centre as well, and the building with the culture side I think is presented in a way that’s accessible and creative.

Greg Edwards, 29, Wirral, operations manager

PB: What are your own experiences around mental health

GE: I was diagnosed with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder in my early twenties. It’s something I’ve always had but it became worse as I got older. Thankfully, I got treatment and support when I was living in London and my recovery started from there, and it’s been pretty good since.

PB: What has helped you?

GE: In terms of keeping well, I think with a lot of mental health issues it’s about the journey you go through. So, learning a lot about yourself, learning about your own resilience, your own trigger points. I think that’s quite important. Keeping well to me is all about self awareness and sort of trying to nip things in the bud before they become a big problem again or blow out of proportion. Living quite a busy, active life suits me and my personality. I do a lot of endurance sport events and things like that to keep me busy and keep my mind healthy. I also do a lot of music and other creative things outside of work which stops me from having too much time to worry about other things, which seems to work.

PB: What challenges do you think young people face?

GE: I would probably say the digital age has caused problems in the sense people are always able to communicate and not necessarily in a healthy way. We see a lot of issues around things like cyber bullying. You know, in the past, if you were bullied at school and you went home, the bullying stopped. Now, if you’re experiencing bullying, it can continue online, in Whats App groups for example.

There’s a lot more acceptance around mental health issues now, which is a really positive thing but I don’t think the support networks, these statutory services, have caught up with the demand, and I think the expectation of young people being able to access support immediately isn’t there. That’s a real obstacle, and I think it causes quite a lot of tension for young people.

PB: How can The Open Door Centre help young people?

GE: One of our key ambitions, and something we’ve always met, is to have no waiting lists. Offering immediate and effective support in a creative, innovative environment is kind of central to what we do. It doesn’t have to be complicated – it’s not anything secretive. It’s all about having a person-centred approach to working with people where we respond to their individualism and help them through their journey in a way that’s compassionate and supportive. Using clinical tools but in a way that’s engaged with other people. It hasn’t got the same formal approach as in some clinical services.

What we’re trying to do really is offer that choice and that opportunity to people if they want to, or they’re not feeling great. They can just come along, sign up with us, and get involved. We’ve been gradually able to support more people each year. Now, moving to the Bloom Building, we’re able to more than triple our support, which is a great step for the charity but hopefully it will help the local area more and help young people more as we see more people.

Joel Dipple, 24, Stafford, venue co-ordinator

PB: What are your own experiences around mental health?

JD: My mental health deteriorated after the death of my best mate. I don’t think it was anything you could see as long term depression or anxiety, but the grief from that was something I bottled up for probably around six months and it came to a head in a series of panic attacks. I then sought grief counselling – for a little while, which helped. I always found for me personally, the art of conversation helped me get through that stage and helps me to this day in terms of coming to terms with what happened.

What I thought would have been great for me at the time was if there was a space like this where I was, where there was a more welcoming environment than something that was clinical. I probably would have sought help far earlier than I did. Now being able to work in an environment which is so welcoming and supportive of others is something that I am quite proud to be in this environment, hopefully helping folk. Even if it is, for me, just being on the coffee shop side of things and making it a welcoming experience for people. It’s great.

PB: What challenges do you think young people face?

JD: From my own experiences, knowing where and who to talk to. I think as young people, we are far more aware of the conversation of mental health and it is far more open, but there is still always the struggle of not wanting to maybe burden friendship groups or close people with mental health issues and not knowing where a conversation can actually take place around it.

PB: How can The Open Door Centre help young people?

JD: Having a space like this where, as Greg was saying, there’s no waiting list and a conversation can happen with someone who’s trained and relatable is an amazing thing.

bloombuilding.co.uk 

We Love Life – Loreta Okeke

3 months ago   |   Words: Rebecca Durband   |   Photography: Liam Jones

We all have mental health and our different ways of staying well. In We Love Life, we uncover the wellbeing habits of people as they go about their days. Here, 20-year old pharmacy student Loreta tells us about her love of exercising, cooking and of course – trashy TV. 

Hello Loreta, what are you currently studying?

I’m studying pharmacy at Liverpool John Moores!

Are you reading or watching anything we should know about? 

I don’t really have time to read because I have so much revision to do! I read the bible which is always great. I’m watching Big Mouth on Netflix which is really good, I’m also watching Snowfall on BBC1. Oh yeah and also my trash TV; The Only Way is Essex, Absolutely Ascot, Real Housewives of Cheshire, Made in Chelsea, all of the good stuff.

What are you listening to?

I listen to a lot of UK music, Afro beats, grime, hip-hop, drill. I like some Latin and gospel too!

Do you have any aspirations for the future? 

I wish to graduate with amazing results and get a good job, well paid. I just want to be happy really, be content in life. Just have good friends and a healthy family, be healthy etc.

What are you most grateful for in life?

I’m happy with where I live, my friends and family, my course, I’ve got a job and all that sort of thing.

And how do you stay mentally well? 

I stay out of people’s drama, keeping myself to myself, I exercise – exercising is really good. I’m not really much of a runner. I love cooking, cooking is really fun. I like leisurely drinking, not heavy drinking, like with the friends you know, social drinking.

 

Kwassa

4 months ago   |   Words: Natalie Lorimer

Scott Verrill is a musician and creative undergoing constant evolution. With childhood band ‘The Theory of 6 Degrees,’ he became one of the youngest musicians to showcase his talents at Glastonbury. Further projects have followed thick and fast, including two independently released EPs under the name KYKO and the development of DIY fashion label Hundred Club.

Verrill’s latest musical project, kwassa, is a nod to the music of his youth; namely Vampire Weekend and the Congolese rumba melodies displayed on their buoyant track ‘Cape Cod Kwassa Kwassa.’ Exploring fizzing pop on ‘Moonwalking,’ the first single released as kwassa, Verrill sings of the euphoria that comes from meeting someone who catches you off guard.

We caught up with Scott to chat all things creativity, swimming and childhood high jinks.

What are you working on at the moment? 

I’m just finishing up final versions of tunes for my up-and-coming EP, and trying to put together a fresh live set to take on the road – I want to make it fun.

What has been your biggest life challenge so far and what did you do to overcome it?

I think by the nature of doing music full time, there’s a lot of anxiety and self doubt that comes in the cycle of putting things out into the world, and I definitely put too much pressure on myself in-between. I’ve started a few other non-musical projects and hobbies, all of which stop me being too consumed in myself.

What have you learned about yourself over the past five or so years?

To trust my own instinct more and to be less swayed by what other people do/think.

What would constitute a ‘perfect’ day for you?

I’d be somewhere hot and sunny with close friends/family, swimming, good food, some sort of musical endeavour, and an evening run on the beach. Oh, and some dogs please.

For what in your life do you feel most grateful?

To be healthy and having a close circle of people I really respect. Also to be doing what I love every day is just the best.

What are you listening to, reading and watching at the moment?

I’m still not over Ariana Grande’s ‘Sweeter’ album, so I’m probably listening to that. I’m reading ‘Call Me By Your Name’ because there’s only so many times you can watch that movie on repeat. I manage to go about my life avoiding Netflix but the number one thing to watch for me is the new Coldplay documentary.

Complete this sentence: “Ace mental health for me means…”

Being comfortable with yourself, acknowledging feelings, and knowing that there’s a way of dealing with everything.

What do you eat to stay healthy?

I love food and am not too strict on what I eat, because I’m definitely happier when I’m not cutting things out. I’m the kind of person that goes to sleep thinking about breakfast. That being said, I hardly eat sugary things, and don’t eat meat these days – and I feel good because of it.

Do you have a daily routine of exercise or do you make it up as you go along?

I try either do a swim or run every day. Swimming is my favourite because there’s no chance of be being near my phone, and being underwater is just the most peaceful place.

Here at The Mind Map we remember playing football and ‘tag’ – running around the playground everyday and loving it – can you share a similar memory?

Someone always brought in a huge pack of cable ties and everyone took some. The aim was just to cable tie the anything in the room to the most stupid place. There were all sorts on the ceiling – shoes, chairs, keys. Probably still a funny game now.

What three songs lift your spirits?

Me and Julio Down By the Schoolyard – Paul Simon

Sir Duke – Stevie Wonder

Viva la Vida – Coldplay

What is your favourite self-help book, or motivational quote?

There’s a guy called Austin Kleon who has a series of creative self-help books which I love. There’s one called ‘Show Your Work’ that I read a lot. It’s all about sharing the creative process, and not being too proud to open up to the people that enjoy your work.

What advice do you offer to friends when they are feeling overwhelmed?

To put yourself first and get some headspace. Life’s too short to let anything actually bother you. Sometimes people just need to talk so it’s good to be a listener, whether you can relate or not.

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