Book
Now

Hannah Ward

Location

Get to know Hannah in our Q&A below! What are your main hobbies? I’m just a normal working girl so my hobbies are just things like going to the cinema, spending time with family and friends, listening to music, going to the gym. I love travelling. What kind of television, films, and music do you […]

Hannah Ward

Hannah can see you in Liverpool, or online for £36 per hour.

Hannah is a BACP qualified counsellor & psychotherapist. She has worked with a range of clients both privately and within GP surgeries. Hannah's expertise lies in the areas of: anxiety, depression, relationship difficulties, low self-esteem and stress. The Liverpool native will help you deal with emotional issues and gain a better understanding of yourself. Her approach is confidential, warm, empathic and tailored to meet your needs. Person-Centred means that you are the focus of the therapy and you are given space and opportunity to reflect on your experience.

All of our therapists are CRB checked. Scroll below to read more about Hannah!

Get to know Hannah in our Q&A below!

What are your main hobbies?

I’m just a normal working girl so my hobbies are just things like going to the cinema, spending time with family and friends, listening to music, going to the gym. I love travelling.

What kind of television, films, and music do you enjoy?

I’ve got a cinema pass so I like to try different things. I try all sorts of films I wouldn’t go to see normally and have really enjoyed them.

I love Beyonce, Destiny’s Child, Jennifer Lopez.

Just anything that puts you in a good mood as well. I like reality TV too, just because it makes you relate to other people. You just switch off for half an hour and don’t think about your life. I don’t want to be switched on all day every day.

What do you do to stay well?

I think self care is so important so, for me, driving home from a session is the most significant thing, listening to my favourite songs. Even things like having a bath and taking time for you. I like to have alone time, which I think is important. If I spend too much time with other people I do want to close off a bit, so I make sure I do have that alone time.

I think a lot of people think self care has to be climbing mountains or big stuff – it’s not. It’s whatever makes you feel better and gives you that space to process what’s happened that day.

What is your favourite place?

New York. I went there last year and absolutely loved it.

I love seeing different cultures, seeing what it’s like in other places, and getting a feel for the food and music there. I think it’s really important to open your eyes, especially because a lot of people would just be in the pub on a Friday night and spend easily £100. That money to me is a flight or a holiday, so I’d rather use my money in that way.

What would you say are the main issues young people are facing today?

I would say nine out of ten of my clients have come to see me due to anxiety. I think anxiety is the biggest issue by far, but I also think that because more people are talking about it it’s not as taboo any more. Most people have had it but it’s more accepted now. They say, “Yeah, I’ve had anxiety so I’m going to go to a counsellor.”

I think people are realising that mental health is just as important as physical health. Mental health should be treated seriously.

You see a lot about suicide in the papers and the media at the moment, especially young males. I have seen more and more males come into my practice, and I’m so pleased that they’re doing that and finding the confidence to come and see someone.

A lot of people don’t talk. Just having one person to talk to makes such a difference and I think it’s so important.

What do you think are the main causes of anxiety?

I would say a lot of it is due to not having someone to talk to, because you bottle it up and then explode one day. You feel even worse and it builds so much.

I think some of it might be genetic causes but a lot of it is societal, just because not everyone thinks it’s okay to come to a counsellor. Some people wouldn’t tell anyone else that they’ve seen someone, but it’s definitely improving from what it was a few years ago.

What would you say are your personal approaches? What kind of therapist are you?

I am trained in Person-Centred therapy, so basically the emphasis is not on the therapist fixing you. It’s more that you’re there to do the work and I’m going to support you, be by your side, and listen to you.

I think the most beneficial part is the listening, as so many people aren’t listened to. It really does help you to open up and unravel things. I don’t give guidance or direction, which a lot of people think counsellors do. I am literally here to listen and help you dig deeper into what the issue is. It’s not about treating the symptoms – it’s about treating the cause.

If a young person was nervous about starting therapy, what would you say to them?

I try and keep it as simple as possible. I explain exactly what’s going to happen.

I try and be as friendly as possible during the conversation, using simple terms to not overcomplicate it. I try to reassure them that you don’t have to keep coming if you don’t like it – you can come once, see how you feel, and then decide if it’s for you. I try and make it as least pressured as possible.

Find Help

View All Therapists