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Nick Peterson

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Get to know Nick in our Q & A below! What are your main hobbies? I like an expressive movement practice called 5Rhythms. I find that it really helps me to express myself and shift any emotions that need to be released. I’ve liked creative writing since I was about eight years-old. I’ve always been […]

Nick Peterson

Nick can see you in Liverpool, or online over skype for £36 per hour.

Nick is a BACP member counsellor specialising in treating anxiety and self esteem issues. His attentive, non-judgemental approach allows clients to explore their issues freely. Nick likes to help clients get things off their chest, helping them to find clarity and resolve inner conflicts. He is enthusiastic about empowering people to grow and transform into who they truly are.

All of our therapists are CRB checked. Scroll below to read more about Nick!

Get to know Nick in our Q & A below!

What are your main hobbies?

I like an expressive movement practice called 5Rhythms. I find that it really helps me to express myself and shift any emotions that need to be released.

I’ve liked creative writing since I was about eight years-old. I’ve always been immersed in that sort of fantasy, imaginary world. I also like walking in nature, playing the ukulele, spending time with friends, and reading.

What kind of television, films, and music do you enjoy?

I think my favourite book of all time is Harry Potter. It’s still up there as a top one. Film wise, I think Lord of the Rings. I also like any music I can move to.

I struggle with picking favourites because I just like so much stuff. Like if you asked what my favourite food was, I wouldn’t be able to tell you because everything I have I just favour it.

What is your favourite place?

Right now, my favourite place to go is Sefton Park in Liverpool. It’s my second home, I’m always there.

What would you say are the main issues young people are facing today?

I think the main issue young people seem to be facing is anxiety and exam related stress. In some cases, low self-esteem as well. I think the pressure to fit in and pressure that comes from society to succeed. There’s a high expectation to get top grades.

There’s a lot of high expectations these days to live a perfect life. A lot of young people on social media feel pressurised to present themselves as living a perfect life. They will see their peers having an experience but often they don’t realise that the other person has curated this. It’s not always that glossy picture image. It’s just about keeping it real but often young people get caught up in those ideals of looking beautiful, being successful, having the job that they want, being able to go travelling, this and that.

Often the ideal life they want doesn’t quite match up with reality. That can cause that discrepancy or that anxiety.

How do you think therapy can help young people?

I think therapy gives people that space to show up as we really are, with everything that’s going on, and make sense of it. If you show up with anxiety, there are certain tools and mindful techniques that can be shared to help alleviate those symptoms. It’s all well and good addressing the anxious symptoms but in therapy we delve deeper and get to the underlying causes of anxiety and what makes them anxious in the first place. Therapy is really a space for delving deep, getting to the root of the issues, and finding a way to work through them.

What do you think your strengths are as a practitioner?

I think clients are very drawn to my mindful approach to therapy. I really try to show clients how to be a mindful witness to the thoughts and emotions that arise, and how to stay centred and rooted as these thoughts and emotions flow by.

What would you say are your personal approaches? What kind of therapist are you?

I think my specialism is mindful awareness. Young people come to me with all sort of things, and I wouldn’t like to say there’s a dominant issue that comes up. Often the presenting issue can come from something like anxiety but everything that’s underlying it is so different for each person. If you just deal with symptoms, it’s just sticking a plaster on the issue.

My approach is Person-Centred therapy, which means my full attention is on the other person and I give them space to share whatever is going on with them. As we begin to share their experience and issues, things begin to unravel and we slowly dig deeper and get to the heart of what’s going on and what’s causing their symptoms. My approach is intuitive and very tailored to each individual. I’m just present with the other person and hold space for them to give them the attention that they need.

The relationship is at the heart of therapy – that’s the healing aspect of it. You can read all the books about therapy that you want but that’s just like reading theory books if you’re planning to take a driving test. You’ve got to actually do it. It’s actually being sat with clients.

If a young person was nervous about starting therapy, what would you say to them?

I would reassure them that the first session is like an introduction to see if we gel and if we’re a good match working together. It’s a chance for them to ask any questions about what therapy is about. That initial session is for me to explain how therapy works, how I work, and what they can really expect from the session.

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