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Tamara Owens

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What are your main hobbies? I’m a musician and I like to play bass. I like to go surfing, and I surf every month in places like Cornwall and Yorkshire. I also love cooking – Trinidad food and lots of fried chicken! What do you do to stay well? Music therapy, for me. Whatever I’m […]

Tamara Owens

Tamara can see you in Liverpool, or online for £36 per hour.

Tamara is an NCS accredited counsellor. She assists her clients to explore their thoughts and feelings in more depth and to help individuals find ways to cope with the root causes of their distress. Having worked extensively across young people's mental health, Tamara is experienced in dealing with the complex issues affecting adolescents.

All of our therapists are CRB checked. Scroll below to read more about Tamara!

What are your main hobbies?

I’m a musician and I like to play bass. I like to go surfing, and I surf every month in places like Cornwall and Yorkshire. I also love cooking – Trinidad food and lots of fried chicken!

What do you do to stay well?

Music therapy, for me. Whatever I’m going through in life, it’s either taking it out on the ocean with surfing or playing music and writing. Even having music jams with other musicians in Liverpool. I have loads of musical friends who want to jam and we take it out in a creative way. That makes me look after myself.

What is your favourite place?

I love Paris, only because it’s been a dream. Growing up in Trinidad, I knew I couldn’t go to these places but it’s on my doorstep now. The opportunity to go to Europe is amazing, but Paris just blew my mind away.

I think it’s the energy, the people. They’re really laid back and really calm. It reminded me of home because it’s got all the bars just to chill. It’s not judgemental – no one cared how you look or what you’re doing. Everybody is in their own world.

What would you say are the main issues young people are facing today?

At the moment, it would be a lot of peer pressure. It’s always about what their friends have, like materialistic things. Even down to 10 year olds that I’ve worked with in counselling, it’s all about, “Mum and dad don’t have this type of car but my friend’s got this such and such.…” There’s so much peer pressure and a lot of bullying. I also treat anxiety and stress, with mild depression sometimes. It’s more to do with society and how society looks at them, for some reason.

I think it’s also about social media. The age group I work with – twelve to eighteen year-olds, even some ten year-olds and nine year-olds – if they put a selfie up on Facebook, they’re watching to see how many ‘likes’ they’ve got. If they haven’t got more than ten ‘likes’ but their friends have got twenty, thirty it’s causing depression and anxiety. They’re thinking, “I’m not looking good enough.” It’s about self-esteem, and it can lead to self harm.

What would you say are your personal approaches? What kind of therapist are you?

I’m very laid back, non-judgemental, and full of empathy. I can relate, and I get really in tune with someone and connect with adolescents.

I’m very person-centred. I let the individual be themselves and I give them the pace to take their time and adjust to where they are, even in the room. It’s about giving them that time to think about that they want to explore. I just sit back and help them solve their problems by themselves. The more they talk, the more they recognise their own issues and I make more suggestions on how to cope.

I like Person-Centred therapy because I always get results. Like I say, I’m not the therapist then. The client doesn’t look at me as a therapist – they look at me as someone listening. It doesn’t matter what qualification you have got; this person has given me the time to sit down, hear me, and hear my issues. In the end, they’re working it out themselves, learning, and thinking. The more they talk, the more the feelings are coming out and they work it out. I’m just there emphasising and exploring.

If a young person was nervous about starting therapy, what would you say to them?

I would say don’t be nervous. I usually let them know about what a therapy session is going to be like. The first session is more about meeting each other, knowing each other, and building a relationship and trust. That’s really important. If you don’t have that trust, it’s not going to work.

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